Originally Published March 8, 2011.

The King cake was especially fun because it was something that I’d seen often in grocery stores around the time of the Mardi Gras celebrations, but had never made myself. It turned out to closely resemble a coffee cake: soft,  lightly sweet, fluffy, not too moist. Overall it was tasty, and I think the dough was perfect, but as I stated in the original post, I would add more of the filling to give it a bit more sweetness and flavor to suit my tastes. I would also refrain from sprinkling the colored sugar so thickly, instead perhaps leaving it with a colored glaze. Though it might have been fun when you were a kid, as an adult, there’s very little pleasure in biting into a crusty, grainy rock of overly-sweet raw sugar that has been glued to the top of an otherwise perfectly-good cake.

In hindsight, I am much more disappointed in the presentation of the cake. Yes, it tasted good regardless of it’s shape, but this sort of thing would never pass anywhere outside of my home kitchen. While I do admit to being somewhat lacking patience when it comes to creating baked goods such as this, It would have been much more beneficial to me to put the extra practice into doing it right. While I am clearly not a professional, yet, it wouldn’t hurt to create in myself the mindset of a professional. And in the culinary field,  that means no excuses for imperfection.

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I don’t consider myself a baker, although I love the simple joy of biting into a fresh, still-warm baked treat. There are many reasons for this, the least of which is impatience. I thrive off the anticipation of a great result, I just hate the suspense of having to wait to find out whether it will indeed be a great result.Baking requires me to mix ingredients and then wait…20, 30, or more minutes until the finished product can be safely consumed. In this case, I had to wait nearly 3 hours from start to finish for my King Cake to be ready to eat.
Although, the satisfaction of finally taking a delicious slice made it more than worth it.
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Most recipes I compared followed a similar pattern. First,  temp the yeast, then add to it a mixture of dairy and sugar that has been warmed on the stove. The flour is gradually mixed in to form a soft, elastic dough, which is allowed to rise.After an hour of rising, the dough is rolled out into a long rectangle and sprinkled with a yummy concoction of sugar, cinnamon, and butter, and then rolled up into a jellyroll. The dough is formed into a doughnut shape, then allowed to rise again before baking.
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If you’re an amateur baker such as myself who stupidly, shamefully, lazily, neglected to seal the circle up properly and didn’t make it quite big enough, you may find yourself faced with the misfortune of pulling a rather oddly-shaped lump out of the oven rather than the beautiful cake ring you envisioned. Oops.
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Don’t Let it Deter you too much though.
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Once you’ve coated the lump in icing and brightly colored sugar, not only does no one know the difference…no one cares.
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Recipe Courtesy of BrownEyedBaker.com. If I were to do this again, I would probably make more filling, and perhaps throw in some chopped nuts or other addition. Otherwise, it was delicious. I brushed my cake with egg whites to give it a shiny golden crust. I unfortunately  neglected to remember to insert a baby.

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